Footballs effect on society

Football and society

I am writing this blog in order to highlight the effects football has had on society and how society has changed or influenced football in a particular way. I have been a football fan for as long as I can remember and it has been a huge part of my life. It has affected the way in which I think and also my physical health. If I was asked when I was young what I wanted to be when I grew up, I would give the same answer as the majority of my peers, which was to be a professional football player, playing for my favourite team. This I’m sure made my father gravely disappointed as he would have imagined a completely different path for me. He would have liked me to be a professional footballer playing for his favourite team. The reason I say ‘completely different path’ isn’t just an attempt to be humorous it is an indication as to how seriously some football fans take the game. Calling it a game in fact would almost be blasphemous to some who see it as more of a way of life. Opposing sides are no longer commonly referred to as competitors they are known as your rivals, implying they are your enemy. Even in the lowest tiers of football, where your average working person plays, the game has been taken so seriously that people have been badly injured through ‘off the field’ violence, parents and supporters can be seen hurling obscene abuse at children and even members of the clubs partaking can be witnessed behaving in such a manner that they either have to be sent from the park by the referee or even by other, more sensible, club members. Although, so far, I am aware I am not painting a particularly pretty picture of what the dubbed ‘beautiful game’ is all about I assure you it is not all doom and gloom to follow. Football has also done a lot of good and I think the bad too often over shadows the good in its representation. For every one ‘nutter’ that behaves like an entitled idiot on show, there are ten good people that are not putting themselves on display to be noticed and or more importantly to be heard, but are simply there for the love of the game. For every violent act that stems from a football match there are countless humane acts performed, made possible, only by the platform Football provides. In the following blog I will discuss in depth how society perceives Football and its professional players, noting the changes from the 50’s up until the current day. I will explore the dangers of how football can be exaggerated into violence, whether it be intentional or unintentional. I will look at how football has affected people financially and I will look at the good that football has done, be it either by individuals, clubs or the game as a whole.

Part II

Football has changed drastically in the past sixty years, both as a spectacle and what people perceive as the correct way of playing it, but perhaps the biggest change is the perception and attitude of its athletes. Today it is reported that the Premier League gets 4.7 billion viewers alone. This change is obviously due to the enormous increase of television owners and the broadcasters reach over the past 60 years. The drastic change in exposure has influenced how professional football players are perceived today, some being just as, or in some cases more, famous than any movie or pop star. This is also down to the dramatic change in lifestyle of the average professional footballer. The financial situation of football has allowed the professional players to live a very flamboyant lifestyle, where as in the fifties and early sixties a professional football player was just your average person, living no more extravagantly than any local business owner in their area. Yes, a local football star was admired and put on a pedestal, but was not placed on top of the world like the ‘celebrity athletes’ of today. The amount of money a professional footballer can make today is enormous, some making €400,000 a week for as long as they can fulfil their contract. I think knowing that they have the potential to make a fortune by the time their career has ended, as well as bolster their stardom, has made them vie for more protection on the pitch than what you would have seen even ten years ago. This makes for a much more ‘stop-start’ style of football. Due to the exposure of the professional game this type of football and the way it is refereed has filtered down into the amateur game, which I think is ultimately a safer style of play for everyone involved. However, this is not the only way in which the style of football has changed drastically since the fifties. Due to improvement in facilities and staff and the growth in stardom of the players, the game of football looks a completely different spectacle than it did 60 years ago. To be blunt, if you watch a football match recorded in the fifties you are likely to see 22 un-groomed men running around in a large puddle of muck kicking around something I would be hard pushed to describe as a football. Due to the terrible conditions of the pitch, football was played more directly and the ball was passed around less, thus allowing for less potential to design ‘moves’ in order to break down the opposition and hindering the players potential to develop the technical skill we see on show today. With more and more money being made by the game, we see more and more facilities, which leads to more people playing the game, which leads to more competition to become a top professional player. This means that today’s top professional footballers must not just be exceptionally talented but must be ‘super athletes’ to have a chance at top level success in the game. I feel the kind of dedication to become that type of athlete means they should be respected as much now as they ever have been if not more so.

Part III

In the this part of my blog, I will be exploring the darker side of footballs influence and the effect it has had on behaviour in our culture. As I said earlier, football has become a massive part of a lot of people’s lives, so much so that people will go to extreme measures to defend the views and beliefs regarding it. A long trail of violence follows football in which vandalism, serious injuries and even deaths have been among the consequences. No other sport in the world has been linked to as many violent incidents among fans as football has. There are many different pieces of evidence to refer to when trying to explain the magnitude of the violence associated with football. One example is when Argentine side Boca Juniors minors played against a local team and a fight broke out on the pitch involving the two sets of players. In a match that was being played for no other reason than to showcase the local talent, fans became so outraged they began to riot and attempted to tear down the steel fence surrounding the pitch in order to attack opposing players. This incident resulted in two deaths, one being that of a nine year boy who had been shot. This incident was a direct result of the indiscipline of the players on the pitch, although of course not all of the violence can be blamed on the players. As is well documented, organised hooliganism has been connected to football in Britain since 1970. These Hooligans cannot be described as fans of football, they are more like members of a cult dedicated to worshipping ‘their club’ and feel that dedication exonerates them from accountability for their violent actions. A lot of these cults or ‘factions’ as they have been dubbed don’t even attend the football matches, they simply travel to meet up with and then brawl with rival factions. This type of behaviour seems to be that of desperate people who simply use football as an excuse to hate someone, and therefore allow themselves vindication for assaulting them. It goes without saying that all football fans are not maniacs, although it is clear that even the rational minded person can get caught up in the crazed senselessness that can occur during a match. A case where this became evident is one where a full stand of rival club fans where mixed together accidentally. This resulted in one set of fans chasing the other to the far end of the stand wall, resulting in said wall being put under so much pressure that it collapsed, killing 39 people. The abuse connected to football is not just limited to the physical however, with the game also having an embarrassing history connected with racism. The most recent case publicised in the media occurred after a match in Paris, when a group of English fans would not allow a Parisian fan aboard a train due to his ethnicity. This violence seems to be decreasing more and more as time goes on, with football clubs and associations doing plenty to combat all of the viciousness associated with the game which I will discuss in more depth in my following posts.

Part IV
With the ever growing popularity and exposure of Football, the amount of money going in and coming out of is ever increasing. Players who play for the top teams in Europe have been given a value by their clubs and or agents. The highest of these valuations that has transcended into an expenditure happened in 2009 when a single player was bought for £80 million (€94 million). This fee, at the time, was ‘just’ £20 million less than what it would have cost to buy a certain established premier league football club. Although this type of fee seems astronomical, since then these type of huge money transactions are becoming more and more common and although this may seem a ludacris type of ‘investment’ it can pay off for the football clubs. The value a player can have does not just depend on a player’s ability on a football pitch. Shirt sales bring in huge amounts of money to a football club if a player has the right type of reputation. It is reported by Real Madrid that the £80 million transfer fee they paid was almost recouped after two years on shirt sales alone. However, this does not cover the vast amounts club pay out on player wages each year, as I mentioned earlier, some players can make an excess of £400,000 per week. Figures like this make it hard to fathom how these football clubs can sustain themselves, however, top Football clubs can bring in £400 million per year sponsorship deals, shirt sales, Merchandising, stock sales and much more. For example a certain football club has agreed a deal with Adidas which will bring them £750 million over the next 10 years alone. These increases in the amount of capital have also affected the fans of the game. Ticket prices have of course increased over the past number of years, as well as shirt prices and even football equipment for the amateur player. The role money is playing in football seems to be growing with no signs of it decelerating. Even with the introduction of the new ‘financial fair play’ rules put in place in order to keep clubs from spending outside their means, I feel money will continue to have an enormous role in football.

Part V

This is the final entry to my blog and I am dedicating it to some of the good that has been done through football and the good football continues to do. I will begin with the obvious, football is great for your physical health. I played football all throughout my youth and along with many other alike it was part of my daily routine. I find that advancements in technology are hindering young people’s desire to play sports now, and more and more youth football teams are disappearing in my area. I think that this lack of availability of football will inevitably affect the physical health of today’s youth. It is not just a person’s physical health football can affect though. There are many charities set up around the world with the aim of encouraging under privileged people to get into the game in order to teach them some of life’s key skills, as well as bring a little more enjoyment into their lives. From my experience, some of the key skills football can teach are teamwork, discipline, ambition, responsibility, modesty, communication and compassion. There are thousands of charities connected to football all over the world, which take advantage of its power over society. One such charity is The Didier Drogba Society, which is dedicated to improving the living conditions of people all over the Ivory Coast, gaining global recognition due to its link with its namesake, professional footballer Didier Drogba. This charity has received, and continues to receive, donations to its causes, which are noble to say the least. It has already helped in numerous ways like setting up a hospital, supplying a young girl with leukaemia treatment and setting up structures such as the Red Cross and orphanages. Other charities like KitAid have been set up with the purpose of getting football fans to donate their so called ‘old kits’ to those in need in Africa. These so called old kits may be considered old to a football fan on our side of the world but a shirt that only gets worn maybe once a week for less than a year and then is never used again is certainly not old to those in need. The power of football and its influence in our culture extends beyond that of charitable work however, it has also has a surprising effect on politics. One such example is when in 1967, Brazilian footballer Pele came to Nigeria, at which time was in the middle of a civil war. Whilst there, he inadvertently caused an agreement to a 48 hour cease fire, in order for both sides to enjoy watching him play (in Nigeria’s most populated city!). This wasn’t the last time a football player would stop a war, believe it or not. Again, Didier Drogba is involved. In 2005 there was an ongoing civil war in the Ivory Coast, and using the influence and respect he had earned through his footballing exploits in the country, Drogba was able successfully end the civil war simply by asking for it. It was mere moments after Drogba had led his side to successful qualification for the World Cup that he asked all members on both sides of the war to lay down their arms, and in less than a week his plea was heard and subsequently granted.

Ultimately, I believe this Blog displays the magnitude of football’s effect on our culture, and when this effect is employed in the right way it has a wide spectrum full of potential to better all of our lives.

Facebook, a good thing.

Facebook Good or bad?

In the following essay I will discuss why I believe Facebook is a good thing. Firstly I am a Facebook user and mainly use its Instant messenger feature. I very seldom post pictures and put up statuses but I do not disagree with people who do, so long as it is done while carefully monitoring the permissions that go along with the post. I’m going to begin my essay by discussing briefly, Facebooks history. In February 2004, Mark Zuckerberg, with the help of Andrew McCollum and Eduardo Saverin, launched a website that would change dramatically over the coming years both in format and in popularity. The Facebook, as it was called, was started in a dorm room at Harvard University, where the three friends were students. Within 24 hours of going online, The Facebook was a community of 1200 Harvard University students. This popularity only kept rising, to the point where other schools wanted to be a part of it. Less than three months later it was being used by most Universities across the U.S. After some financial backing Facebook continued its rapid expansion and in 2006 Facebook was made available to anyone with an email address. In this year its number of users grew by 89%. The next step for Facebook was direct advertising. In August 2007 Facebook did just that by offering advertisers direct access to their targeted demographic consumers. Today Facebook has almost a billion and a half users.

My first on why Facebook is a good thing is that it can help you get a job. An average person’s Career will take up over a third of their life. Facebook is a great way to show potential employers what you’re all about outside of work for starters. You can display what you do on a day to day bases, what your hobbies are and what you’re passionate about. Looking at a person’s Facebook could defeat the purpose of an interview as some post about themselves so frequently that an employer will know exactly who they are and what they are about after one look at their Facebook. As well as this becoming friends or liking any company that you are looking to work for or already working for is another good use of Facebook. Not only will this show interest in a particular company, but it will also help to show a commitment to the company as well. This may also give you a leg up on the competition when going for a job as by studying the companies Facebook you may gain valuable information that others may not have. Another way to stand out from the competition using Facebook is to show off some of your work. You could post samples of your work and building a visual portfolio of yourself, your capabilities and past experiences is surely the best type of CV a person could have.

The second reason I think Facebook is a good thing is because it is an unbelievably easy and efficient way to communicate with other people. There is no faster way to spread news than over Facebook. If you post something up to and above 1000 people could see it within minutes. This is sometimes viewed as a negative thing but there are privacy settings on Facebook to allow users control who gets to see what. Facebook is a tool that allows everyone to stay in touch, easily and quickly. Before social media, there was no mass personal information sharing, other than sending a group email and that function was mainly used for spam. Facebook allows for friendships to stay strong and friends and family to stay in contact despite great distances. This point is valid since before Facebook if someone wanted to know about another person they had to actively seek information but Facebook presents it to you in the “news feed,” allowing you to get the information you wanted without having a fortune on Phone calls. Facebook also allows you to stay close with people you are already close with and also provides a platform to make new friends.

Facebook has brought countless numbers of people and groups together Facebook has helped long-lost friends and family to find each other and is good a great platform for communication in complicated situation like this, because of its instant messaging service. It has helped spread the word about different charitable organizations, one that comes to mind is the recent ALS Ice bucket challenge which, thanks to going ‘Viral’ on Facebook, raised over $100 million.   It has also helped people to make educated and informed decisions on many issues which they may only have gained information on by word of mouth in the past and it has even helped the police locate criminals. Facebook isn’t just great for solving large problems, it’s also great for solving everyday annoyances, for example if a friend is travelling and is looking for a lift, one post on Facebook from you and said friend and, in my experience, more often than not someone will lend a hand.

Facebook sponsors ads for products, services and businesses. If a business was to put an ad on Facebook, there would be a greater chance of increase in revenue due to how many people log onto Facebook every day. Joining your business website with Facebook has never been easier and the benefits speak for themselves, with 50% of Facebook users checking their profile every day. These users are all potential customers of yours and any business should use Facebook as an opportunity to expose these potential customers to your brand/product.

Facebook is also your online Photo album and there is no doubt that the people of my generation will have hundreds more photos than that of parents with Facebook providing the platform for us to document our entire lives. In years to come perhaps the children of those of my generation will be able to compare themselves to how their parents behaved growing up.

In short Facebook is good because it provides you a platform in which to communicate easily with friends and family new and old, share things about yourself in order to benefit your life, both Career and personal and maybe most importantly when you are dead and gone Facebook acts as almost a shrine to your life if used right and will last as long as the site itself.

Website reviews

The purpose of this blog will be to find and discuss four websites. Two of these websites will be ones which I believe are of good quality and two which I believe are bad quality. I will be judging them in terms of what they offer, they’re ability to deliver on that offer, they’re availability of information, the level of accessibility of that information, they’re layout and they’re level of functionality. The four websites I have chosen are Facebook, Youtube,

Facebook

The first website I choose was Facebook as it is probably the site I frequent the most. Facebook is a social media site which means it is an online platform to be used for sharing ideas, conversation, pictures, videos and other media platforms. Facebook is the most frequented site in the world and has over 1.4 billion profiles attached to it. This means that every day Facebook could have up to that amount of traffic running through it and yet it very rarely crashes and if it does happen to crash it does not last very long. In my experience using Facebook it has never been down for more than 24 hours. This means that it is exceptionally well run and monitored. Facebook is laid out very simply, if you happened to be a first time user of Facebook the first page you will see after signing up will have almost every option you need and or want right in front of you. This means that you don’t have to click through page after page trying to get to you were you want to go, with almost all options on Facebook it is a simple read then click once. Which is very rare for most websites these days as it seems the preferable method is to host many different option pages inside the sites domain. Facebook has all of the information you need on their page which is accessible very easily again by simply clicking the about us link. One of Facebook biggest criticisms I find it’s that all of your information is out for anyone to see once you have posted it but this simply isn’t the fault of the website itself but the naivety of the user. Facebook provides the option to the user every time they post to control who sees that post.

Youtube

Another website I chose was Youtube and it is the most popular video sharing site on the web. Youtube is used to upload, view, comment, rate and share Videos. Videos posted on Youtube can be shared with anyone or people who request to view your channel so the amount of privacy you have is entirely up to you the user. Not all Videos posted as public videos are available to all Youtube users, there are also restrictions based on age. Youtube is Very easy to use, even to a person with little experience using a computer. Watching a video is as simple as pressing play and there are easily accessible controls for the volume and the screen size. Comments get posted below the video and there is a clear designated are for writing you comment. YouTube makes a list of related videos and/or recommended videos to the video you are currently watching, just in case you’re looking for something more. When your video is finished playing YouTube will scroll through some additional suggestions in the viewing pane. Notes and suggestions can also be left over the video while it is playing. Youtube also runs Advertisements before featured videos but watching most of these is optional after five seconds. It also has a good support system, most issues you might have are covered in the FAQ section and if not you can ask a question or search for a specific term in the help section and the results will immediately pop up. Youtube continues to grow in popularity and in usefulness, even going as far to provide many with a platform to find work.

Myspace

Before Facebook Myspace was the leading social networking site in the world. My space’s functionality is awful. Myspace users were allowed to create and edit their page when they join Myspace and while this may sound like a good idea it can easily get out of control and make the user’s page almost un-usable due to the amount of clutter that can be amassed. Facebook’s simple style has proved much more effective and functional. Myspace Pages are covered with colourful backgrounds and text isn’t highlighted or displayed stronger than these colours. This makes it difficult to find and use the pages content. Another feature of Myspace which makes you want to avoid the page altogether is that Users have the option to have music automatically play once you enter their page. This feature of Myspace would drive most anyone mad especially if like me they always forget to turn down the volume on their Phone/Laptop. Myspace might not even take all the blame for this as they provide the option for the auto play to be switched off my the site holder but there is no excuse for the Adds auto playing music, usually along with the music on the site holders page, creating noise that makes you want to exit the page and never look back. Another of Myspace downfalls was the fact that when its completion was allowing you to use your real name as a user name it had you create false one. This may have been created with the best intentions but just became illogical as when people began posting pictures of themselves and writing about where they were, someone knowing their name was going to be the least of their worries anyway. Myspace usability in terms of what its main purpose was, which was communication was awful. During the time Myspace was at its most popular this seemed perfectly fine. It wasn’t until Facebook came along and showed there was a much better way of doing this that people really realised how bad Myspace version was. Comments to one another were loaded with a scrolling guestbook. The comments also had very little restrictions and are filled with text, pictures, videos and gifs without any context in the conversation. The last and maybe most annoying thing about Myspace was the utterly ridiculous amount of spam. It’s accepted that with most websites, social networking websites in particular you are going to get spam, but with Myspace there was, in my experience, so much spam that the website just wasn’t useable anymore.

iTunes

iTunes is a site used to download, listen to, share, sell, transfer and store music. It is a hugely popular but its functionality is awful. There’s no drag-and-drop option on iTunes. Instead you have too manually manage music and videos which takes three times as long and with this, you’re syncing but in a very un-convenient way. Syncing then really becomes a problem when you have more than one Device to sync to one library, especially if you have an iPod and an iPad. When you do sync a device to itunes adding songs is incredibly slow. My laptop is in perfect conditions and has high running speeds but I can still only Add at most 6 songs at a time with iTunes, when using other sites I can add three times the songs in a third of the time. You would think that these problems could be easily fixed with an update but I seem to get a request to update iTunes almost every two weeks and none of the main problems are solved. As well as these annoying requests I also am constantly getting pop ups asking me to download other apple products which I cannot get rid of. Once you have found the song you are looking for and downloaded it the iTunes player is fine but the library has a bad habit of duplicating your songs when you move them from one place to another, taking up space on your device. A lot of the problems with iTunes seem like they could be easily fixed but they have been the same problems that have been going on for years.

Football and Society (References)

http://sites.duke.edu/wcwp/research-projects/mediamarketsfootball-in-contemporary-europe/the-money/

http://sites.duke.edu/wcwp/research-projects/mediamarketsfootball-in-contemporary-europe/the-player/

http://www.topendsports.com/sport/soccer/history.htm

http://www.thedidierdrogbafoundation.com/archives/the-united-foundation.html

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/football/international/2318500/Didier-Drogba-brings-peace-to-the-Ivory-Coast.html

Hall, S, ‘The Treatment of ‘Football Hooligans’ in the Press’, in Ingham et al., (1978) Football Hooliganism: The Wider Context, London: Inter-Action Inprint

“Football riot’s stupidity, not ethnic, say clubs”. Sydney Morning Herald. 2005-03-14. Retrieved 2007-06-10

http://kitaid.net/

http://www2.deloitte.com/uk/en/pages/sports-business-group/articles/annual-review-of-football-finance.html

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/article-2917198/Manchester-United-sponsorship-worth-750m-forces-adidas-reassess-relationship-England-cricket.html

https://prezi.com/cvzisif46noq/all-about-football-since-1950s/

http://www.theguardian.com/football/when-saturday-comes-blog/2014/jul/07/world-cup-tv-television-coverage-changed-1954-1958

Football and Society (Part 5)

Part V

This is the final entry to my blog and I am dedicating it to some of the good that has been done through football and the good football continues to do. I will begin with the obvious, football is great for your physical health. I played football all throughout my youth and along with many other alike it was part of my daily routine. I find that advancements in technology are hindering young people’s desire to play sports now, and more and more youth football teams are disappearing in my area. I think that this lack of availability of football will inevitably affect the physical health of today’s youth. It is not just a person’s physical health football can affect though. There are many charities set up around the world with the aim of encouraging under privileged people to get into the game in order to teach them some of life’s key skills, as well as bring a little more enjoyment into their lives. From my experience, some of the key skills football can teach are teamwork, discipline, ambition, responsibility, modesty, communication and compassion. There are thousands of charities connected to football all over the world, which take advantage of its power over society. One such charity is The Didier Drogba Society, which is dedicated to improving the living conditions of people all over the Ivory Coast, gaining global recognition due to its link with its namesake, professional footballer Didier Drogba. This charity has received, and continues to receive, donations to its causes, which are noble to say the least. It has already helped in numerous ways like setting up a hospital, supplying a young girl with leukaemia treatment and setting up structures such as the Red Cross and orphanages. Other charities like KitAid have been set up with the purpose of getting football fans to donate their so called ‘old kits’ to those in need in Africa. These so called old kits may be considered old to a football fan on our side of the world but a shirt that only gets worn maybe once a week for less than a year and then is never used again is certainly not old to those in need. The power of football and its influence in our culture extends beyond that of charitable work however, it has also has a surprising effect on politics. One such example is when in 1967, Brazilian footballer Pele came to Nigeria, at which time was in the middle of a civil war. Whilst there, he inadvertently caused an agreement to a 48 hour cease fire, in order for both sides to enjoy watching him play (in Nigeria’s most populated city!). This wasn’t the last time a football player would stop a war, believe it or not. Again, Didier Drogba is involved. In 2005 there was an ongoing civil war in the Ivory Coast, and using the influence and respect he had earned through his footballing exploits in the country, Drogba was able successfully end the civil war simply by asking for it. It was mere moments after Drogba had led his side to successful qualification for the World Cup that he asked all members on both sides of the war to lay down their arms, and in less than a week his plea was heard and subsequently granted.

Ultimately, I believe this Blog displays the magnitude of football’s effect on our culture, and when this effect is employed in the right way it has a wide spectrum full of potential to better all of our lives.

Football and Society (Part 4)

Part IV
With the ever growing popularity and exposure of Football, the amount of money going in and coming out of is ever increasing. Players who play for the top teams in Europe have been given a value by their clubs and or agents. The highest of these valuations that has transcended into an expenditure happened in 2009 when a single player was bought for £80 million (€94 million). This fee, at the time, was ‘just’ £20 million less than what it would have cost to buy a certain established premier league football club. Although this type of fee seems astronomical, since then these type of huge money transactions are becoming more and more common and although this may seem a ludacris type of ‘investment’ it can pay off for the football clubs. The value a player can have does not just depend on a player’s ability on a football pitch. Shirt sales bring in huge amounts of money to a football club if a player has the right type of reputation. It is reported by Real Madrid that the £80 million transfer fee they paid was almost recouped after two years on shirt sales alone. However, this does not cover the vast amounts club pay out on player wages each year, as I mentioned earlier, some players can make an excess of £400,000 per week. Figures like this make it hard to fathom how these football clubs can sustain themselves, however, top Football clubs can bring in £400 million per year sponsorship deals, shirt sales, Merchandising, stock sales and much more. For example a certain football club has agreed a deal with Adidas which will bring them £750 million over the next 10 years alone. These increases in the amount of capital have also affected the fans of the game. Ticket prices have of course increased over the past number of years, as well as shirt prices and even football equipment for the amateur player. The role money is playing in football seems to be growing with no signs of it decelerating. Even with the introduction of the new ‘financial fair play’ rules put in place in order to keep clubs from spending outside their means, I feel money will continue to have an enormous role in football.

Football and Society (Part 3)

Part III

In the this part of my blog, I will be exploring the darker side of footballs influence and the effect it has had on behaviour in our culture. As I said earlier, football has become a massive part of a lot of people’s lives, so much so that people will go to extreme measures to defend the views and beliefs regarding it. A long trail of violence follows football in which vandalism, serious injuries and even deaths have been among the consequences. No other sport in the world has been linked to as many violent incidents among fans as football has. There are many different pieces of evidence to refer to when trying to explain the magnitude of the violence associated with football. One example is when Argentine side Boca Juniors minors played against a local team and a fight broke out on the pitch involving the two sets of players. In a match that was being played for no other reason than to showcase the local talent, fans became so outraged they began to riot and attempted to tear down the steel fence surrounding the pitch in order to attack opposing players. This incident resulted in two deaths, one being that of a nine year boy who had been shot. This incident was a direct result of the indiscipline of the players on the pitch, although of course not all of the violence can be blamed on the players. As is well documented, organised hooliganism has been connected to football in Britain since 1970. These Hooligans cannot be described as fans of football, they are more like members of a cult dedicated to worshipping ‘their club’ and feel that dedication exonerates them from accountability for their violent actions. A lot of these cults or ‘factions’ as they have been dubbed don’t even attend the football matches, they simply travel to meet up with and then brawl with rival factions. This type of behaviour seems to be that of desperate people who simply use football as an excuse to hate someone, and therefore allow themselves vindication for assaulting them. It goes without saying that all football fans are not maniacs, although it is clear that even the rational minded person can get caught up in the crazed senselessness that can occur during a match. A case where this became evident is one where a full stand of rival club fans where mixed together accidentally. This resulted in one set of fans chasing the other to the far end of the stand wall, resulting in said wall being put under so much pressure that it collapsed, killing 39 people. The abuse connected to football is not just limited to the physical however, with the game also having an embarrassing history connected with racism. The most recent case publicised in the media occurred after a match in Paris, when a group of English fans would not allow a Parisian fan aboard a train due to his ethnicity. This violence seems to be decreasing more and more as time goes on, with football clubs and associations doing plenty to combat all of the viciousness associated with the game which I will discuss in more depth in my following posts.